The Expendable: “Mechanic: Resurrection” and What We Actually Want from Jason Statham

Less clichés, more batshit craziness.

Jason Statham has a problem.

This might not be a fair thing to say, but almost every movie where he doesn’t get to go completely off the rails is either generically entertaining or a waste of his potential. We thrive off of his unstoppable kinetic energy and the unique set of traits he brings to the proverbial table (everything from his one-liners that sound even better with his accent to some of his fight scenes that requires such an elaborate use of props, even Jackie Chan is impressed).

The vast majority of his work blends in with each other; other than his roles in the Cranks and the Transporters of his filmography, his career has been pretty much one formulaic action flick after another. The only reason we enjoy them more than, say, any other typical action film is because each one usually comes equipped with a set of those classic “Statham moments” we’ve come to love, but almost none of them expand those moments to cover the length of an entire movie.

Sadly Mechanic: Resurrection doesn’t break that trend. Instead, it joins his increasingly bland list of action films, but like most of his work, it is also a mostly enjoyable experience on a superficial level and it does admittedly have a handful of Statham-esque moments. I would argue in the big picture, it’s probably an underwhelming film, but in terms of how it stacks up to Statham’s other work, I would say it’s a good fit in the top twenty percent.

Having said that, this is a movie that’s riddled with tired and cringeworthy clichés, including a forced and rushed romantic relationship with Jessica Alba and lame fight sequences that are somehow just bland enough to be mostly forgettable and just interesting enough to make this a movie worth watching once.

I guess that’s the most frustrating aspect of this whole thing: it comes so close to being a crazy Statham movie, but it keeps walking up to the edge and then backing down. It’s almost like they couldn’t decide whether to fully unleash him, so they tried to find a middle ground.

I say fuck that.

Either burn it all down or let the man be the definitive example of a bull in a china shop. I’ve said this a billion times at this point, but it’s better to either be atrocious or excellent. Being middling is the worst. That’s not quite the description I would use for this movie, however.

All in all, it’s carried by Statham’s energetic effort, as well as a relatively quick pace that keeps things moving. Tommy Lee Jones also rocks our socks off during those brief moments he’s onscreen. The swimming pool sequence (which we kind of see in the trailers) is pretty badass. Really, it’s a perfectly serviceable late summer action flick – the type that hits Amazon Prime or Netflix and ends up being popular for a while, overshadowing the more “prestigious” titles in people’s queues.

Who has time for Oscar-nominated dramas or critically acclaimed indies when Jason Statham is waiting to blow your mind, right?

It’s a shame, though, that people don’t seem to realize Statham’s best moments are when he gets to do fucking savage things like punting a head into a swimming pool, beating the shit out of someone while he’s on fire, or fighting off henchmen in a fight involving lots of lots of oil. His list of iconic cinematic moments is only rivaled by other masters we recognize through one word: Pacino, Denzel, Sandler.

We really don’t need any more half-assed movies starring Jason Statham. Hell, we don’t need any more semi-competent movies like this one. We need more movies like Crank and the Transporter trilogy (fuck off, Ed Skrein). Please, Hollywood. Don’t fuck this up for us. Or for Jason Statham.